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Actually Sticking to New Years Intentions (Finally!!)



Things We Dive Into In This Episode:

  1. Q&A - movement without weight loss anxiety & suggestions for nutrition goals in the new year

  2. Choosing a word of the year as your guidepost and theme for the year

  3. My word of the year


📘Resources


📌Episode Highlights


Q&A


I finally got myself going back to the gym consistently, but every time I'm there, I find myself constantly thinking about losing weight. How can I get myself to just keep going to the gym and keep moving my body without constantly thinking about weight loss? 


  • Forgive yourself for having these thoughts. We can't turn them off like a faucet. But we can reduce the frequency of them through.

  • When the thoughts do come up we can reroute our energy and our attention somewhere else.

  • Suggestions for really reducing the thoughts about body shame that come up at the gym:

    • Prioritize enjoyment! Prioritize workouts that feel genuinely enjoyable for you. It doesn't mean that you don't feel challenged. But what it does mean is that you do actually enjoy the workout practice in some way, shape or form. You are not looking at the clock, you are not constantly dissociating or checking out. You are staying present. We don't get lost in the anxious thoughts about weight loss because we're present, because we're there, because we are enjoying ourselves.

    • Think about your past self and think about your future self. 

    • When you think about your little baby self, what kind of movement practices does she deserve to do? What kind of movement does she want to do? What kind of movement is fun for her? What kind of movement is freeing for her? Can you think about the things that you genuinely liked to do as a kid? And can you incorporate that into your movement practice today? 

    • Think about your older self too. What kind of movement practices would she want you to be doing to not waste the life that you're living today? What would she be happy that you did?

  • Last important note is to make sure that you're adequately nourished when you're exercising. If you are someone who is excessively restricting food, if you're someone who is engaging in disordered eating behaviors, if you're someone who's not getting enough sleep, enough water, enough time to decompress…of course, you're just going to feel anxious when you're forcing yourself to work out. Just saying have fun is not enough for someone who is working out malnourished. So we definitely need that baseline of nourishment when exercising. It is only with enough energy that we can then expend energy through movement. 



I set goals related to nutrition every single year, and every single year I absolutely do not meet them. By January 10th, I've already given up, and I just don't wanna think about food for the rest of the year. What do you suggest? 


  • Make sure that your intentions are centered on what you want to do more of instead of what you want to do less of. It takes the shame out of your goals by making them in the positive instead of in the negative. So instead of I'm not going to eat a bunch of snacks at night, I am going to fill my nights with many different forms of stress relief, or I am going to teach my brain to find some relief in other forms of self-care by doing them before I feel like I need them.

  • Simplify, simplify, simplify, your intentions related to nutrition. Give yourself complete and total permission to take the all or nothing out of the things that you want to do. So for example, if your goal is to just eat more vegetables, this isn't about ordering a salad for lunch every single day. It's about little things like putting spinach in your eggs in the morning, mixing peas or broccoli into your mac and cheese, or buying some micro greens that you can just like throw on any meal. Or if your goal is to exercise more, it's not always about doing a full blown 60 to 75 minute workout class. It's about rolling out your yoga mat while your pasta water is boiling. That can be enough. It's about rolling out your yoga mat for five minutes first thing in the morning and just doing some stretches and 10 jumping jacks. That does make a difference in your life. 

  • Doing just a little something is not only better than doing nothing, it's also better than doing everything. Also better than doing it all. We burn out really, really quickly when we try to do it all. When we look at things we burn out so quickly.

  • Create a word of the year that encapsulates your intention or what you want to work towards for the year and try to let your nutrition and wellness decisions be informed by that word. 



Word of the Year


Your word of the year is your theme for the year. It's your guidepost for the year while you're navigating different decisions and moving throughout your day. It's like a compass, rather than something that you need to achieve. 


  • Use your word of the year as your compass while you're making certain decisions about nutrition and health and more, about food and movement and more, and I also invite you to let it be a little bit of a spiritual intention. Surrender, let go, and notice the unexpected ways in which you may be shown to different lessons that have to do with your theme that you could have never expected. 

  • We have all year to use this theme and you might just be using the first couple months of the year to get charged up, to get grounded, to get centered, and to figure out what the word actually means to you. 

  • Write a mission statement around that word. That can change and evolve as the year goes on, but try to create one that is just for now to get you started.



Thanks for listening! 💖 Stay tuned to my website for more episode updates and other exciting programs and resources.


Transcript


Caitie: I don't want to clench onto life so hard. I want to remember that I have time. I know that my time is finite. So I don't want to sleep on it or linger or hesitate on things too much. But I also don't want to live like the last grain of sand is about to drop all of the time. You know, I guess even if the last grain of sand is about to drop, I don't want to spend my time watching that last grain of sand dropping. I want to embrace it and appreciate it and share it and love it and be patient. 


Welcome to Whole, Full, & Alive, a podcast helping you feed yourself, feel yourself and be yourself. I'm Caitie Corradino. I'm a registered Dietitian-Nutritionist, a body image coach and the founder of Full Soul Nutrition, a method that combines nutrition counseling with a powerful toolkit of somatic healing modalities. I have guided hundreds of clients to freedom with food, their bodies and every aspect of their lives. I've also been through this healing myself, and on this podcast, I want to help you eat with confidence, embrace your body, form aligned relationships and create a life that you're in love with. I'll share actionable tools, no bullshit stories and interviews that will remind you why you have everything you need within you to feel whole, full and alive. Are you ready? Let's get into it.


Hey, welcome back to another episode of Whole, Full, & Alive, the podcast that helps you feed yourself, feel yourself, and be yourself. I am so grateful to be here with you today for the second episode of 2024. We're going weekly. I was just on this microphone last week and I'm back on the microphone this week and I'm here for an actual, an actual short episode this time. Last week I was like, all right, fresh 2024 energy, my episodes are gonna be shorter now. And then the episode was still an hour somehow, big lie. So today's episode is actually gonna move at the 2024 pace that I am hoping for. 


But before I start moving a little bit faster, let's slow down. Let's slow down and take a deep breath wherever you are tuning in from, I invite you to take the deepest breath you have taken all day today. Take a nice deep inhale through your nose, fill your chest, fill your belly, and then exhale, clear something out your mouth. Alright, if you need another one of those, I invite you to take another one of those whenever you need it. Come back to you. Drop back into your body. Stretch out your neck. Roll out your shoulders. Don't forget to stay. Stay with you throughout the day, today. This world makes it really easy for us to live our entire day in our head, and I encourage you to keep coming back into your body. It holds so much wisdom. 


Okay, so today's episode is going to be about setting intentions in the new year or at any time of the year, setting goals and intentions at any time of the year and actually sticking with them. Actually, finally freaking sticking with them. I am going to provide some tools for setting goals and intentions that you actually aligned with. And I'm also going to talk about interrupting body shame when your goals start to center on the rigid pursuit of weight loss. How can you come back to centering your goals on the pursuit of health and wellbeing and not let your goals be motivated by shame? I'm going to provide a lot of concrete tools for that today. I got two really great questions about this that I'm going to answer at the top of the episode. 


And then I'm going to share my personal intentions for 2024. I always pick a word of the year to serve as my guide, as my compass, as my theme for the year. This is a practice I've been doing for like seven or eight years now, and I love it. It's my favorite thing, and I want to share it with you and tell you more about why I chose the word I chose this year, and maybe it will help you and inspire you to choose a word that really feels good for you.


That's today's episode. I'm gonna answer two questions and I'm gonna give you some tools for setting goals and intentions in the new year and share my word of 2024. So we're gonna dive right in, but let me first just remind you that my Nutrition & Intuition retreat is coming up in a little bit, a little bit over two months from today. It's happening in Scotland. It is going to be five nights and six days of joyful movement classes, breathwork practices, body image workshops, delicious meals, hikes and exploration of the foothills of Scotland and really, really, really nourishing community. If you are someone who is feeling stuck in body shame or body avoidance, and you really desire to have a relationship with movement and food that allows you to fully nourish yourself and live your best life and feel confident, and you're also seeking community that isn't going to be dieting and restricting and shaming themselves, but practicing nourishing self care that actually feels really, really good. I am so excited to invite you on my Nutrition & Intuition Retreat. It's also an incredible opportunity to travel to Scotland, which is a country that feels like coming home. The cozy hospitality in Scotland is my favorite thing. So if you're interested in that, please just DM me on Instagram at @caitie.c.rd, capital letters, retreat, or you can visit my website, fullsoulnutrition.com/retreat.


I also have a few spaces open for 1:1 coaching right now. I provide a combination of nutrition counseling, body image coaching, and self-confidence coaching, I'm here to help you heal from disordered eating, digestive issues, body dysmorphia, food intolerances and more. You can also check out my website, fullsoulnutrition.com/1-1-coaching for more information on that. 


So let's dive into today's episode. All right, so let's dive into today's Q&A. The first question I received is, I finally got myself going back to the gym consistently, but every time I'm there, I find myself constantly thinking about losing weight. How can I get myself to just keep going to the gym and keep moving my body without constantly thinking about weight loss? I am so grateful to the person who very vulnerably shared this question. Thank you so much for sending this in. I know for certain that you are not alone in feeling this way. And I think a lot of people could use some compassionate support and guidance around this exact thing right now. So thank you so much for sharing what you shared. 


The first thing I wanna say is that it makes so much sense that you are thinking about weight loss constantly. It makes so much sense that weight loss is the first thing that might pop into your mind when you think about cultivating a more intentional movement practice. We live in a world that is bombarded by messages about shaping up and trimming down and toning. And people are constantly complementing each other's body shape and size. Look at your arms, look at your abs, look at your butt. Right. And of course, our brain is going to default to that way of thinking if that's what we've been feeding our brain. And we can't help feeding our brain these messages because it is a lot of just, because so much of it is just what we're swimming in. By default, we can't necessarily change the entire culture around us. We can set boundaries with certain things, right? We don't have to watch the Kardashians and we don't have to talk to our mom about her diet. And we don't have to engage with friends who are talking about toning up. And also there's only so many boundaries that we can set with all of this messaging. We can't force our brain to not absorb all of this stuff that is out there. We also can't force our thoughts to change. We can't just tell our thoughts to turn off like a faucet. Certain thoughts are going to pop up because our brain is really good at protecting itself. Our brain is really good at doing what it needs to do to try to make us feel safe. And if all we've been exposed to is all of these messages about weight loss at the gym, about working out to lose weight, our brain is going to be like, that's how we source safety. That's what feels good. That's what feels constant. That's what feels consistent. 


So the first thing is forgive yourself for having these thoughts. It makes a lot of sense. And we can't necessarily turn them off like a faucet. But what we can do is we can reduce the frequency of them through some things that I'm gonna say right now. We can end when the thoughts, and the second thing we can do is that when the thoughts do come up, we can reroute our energy and our attention somewhere else. We can thank the thought and say, hey, thanks for trying to protect me and trying to give me a sense of belonging in this fat phobic world, but I actually really don't want to think about losing weight while I'm at the gym I actually really want to think about something else. 


So here are my few suggestions for really reducing the thoughts about body shame that come up at the gym. The first thing is prioritize enjoyment, prioritize workouts that feel genuinely enjoyable for you. Doesn't mean that it doesn't feel hard. It doesn't mean that you don't feel challenged. It doesn't mean that you don't reach a moment where you're like, ah, this is really tough. I'm sweating, I'm shaking, whatever it is. But for the most part, but what it does mean is that you do actually enjoy the workout practice in some way, shape or form. You are not looking at the clock, you are not constantly dissociating or checking out, you are staying present. I find that when we do workouts that don't have us staring at the clock, when we do workouts that don't have us dissociating and thinking about when is this gonna be over and what am I gonna go get for dinner afterwards? We don't get lost in the anxious thoughts about weight loss because we're present, because we're there, because we are enjoying ourselves. If you're doing a workout that you feel like you have to do that feels like an obligation, that feels like a box to tick, I promise you, you are so much more likely to dive into anxious thoughts about weight loss or whatever your favorite flavor of anxious thoughts are, your brain's gonna drift there when you're doing something that you hate. How about you prioritize doing something that you love? 


And my second tool for this is if you're having a hard time figuring out what kinds of movement you love, think about your past self and think about your future self. This is also a really good tool for just like practicing a sense of self-compassion in general, thinking about your little baby kid self and thinking about your older, aged future self. When you think about your little tiny baby self, what kind of movement practices does she deserve to do? What kind of movement does she want to do? What kind of movement is fun for her? What kind of movement is freeing for her? Can you think about the things that you genuinely like to do as a kid that helped you get the zoomies out as a kid? And can you think about incorporating that into your movement practice today? And then I say, think about your older self too, because what kind of movement practices would she want you to be doing to not waste the life that you're living today? When I think about my older self, when I think about 90 year old Caitie, she is not going to be very happy with me if I spend three hours of my week on a spin bike. I hate spinning. I think spinning is the most boring thing in the entire world. I feel like my feet are just strapped and trapped and attached to the bike and I find it so boring. I love to dance and I love to do yoga and Pilates and I love to do more dynamic movement like that. And when I think about my older self she's gonna wanna look back at her life and she's gonna be like, wow, I'm so glad I spent time in that community yoga studio. Wow, I'm so glad I spent time making movement a spiritual practice. I'm so glad I found dancing again when I was 29. And I think it is really important to look at that older, or think about that older version of yourself. What would she be happy that you did? There's so many things of course that I can say about anxious thoughts that come up related to weight loss when you're moving your body. But I think these are just two tools that I found are really, these are just two tools that I found are really, really helpful for me, making it fun thinking about your younger self and your older self. And that is just a general tool for self-compassion too. Like I was saying, when you're having a hard time being kind to yourself, think about being kind to little you and then think about what older you is going to want to look back on. She'll be so glad that you didn't miss this part of your life. She'll be so glad that you enjoyed this part of your life.


And I think one more thing I want to say about all of this too, is to make sure that you're adequately nourished when you're exercising. If you are someone who is excessively restricting food, if you're someone who is engaging in disordered eating behaviors, if you're someone who's not getting enough sleep, enough water, enough time to decompress, of course, you're just going to feel anxious when you're forcing yourself to work out. Of course, your brain is going to resort to its favorite flavor of anxiety when you're working out. You know, just saying have fun is not enough for someone who is working out malnourished. So we definitely need that baseline of nourishment when you are exercising. And we certainly need that baseline of whatever support it is you need to get enough food into your body. It is only with enough energy that we can then expend energy through movement. I hope that is feeling like, I hope that's one thing that can get your wheels turning on this. 


The second question that I got is, I set goals related to nutrition every single year, and every single year I absolutely do not meet them. By January 10th, I've already given up, and I just don't wanna think about food for the rest of the year. What do you suggest? Major, major gratitude to the person who asked this question too. There are three things that come to mind for me here, and it's actually going to be a really nice segue into part two of this podcast. So the first thing is make sure that your intentions are centered on what you want to do more of instead of what you want to do less of. So take the shame out of your goals by making them in the positive instead of in the negative. So instead of I'm not going to eat a bunch of snacks at night, I am going to fill my nights with many different forms of stress relief, or I am going to teach my brain to find some relief in other forms of self-care by doing them before I feel like I need them. So practicing a little bit more preventative self-care, a little bit more preventative nervous system regulation before it's state of emergency and you've got to regulate yourself.


And when you're making these goals in the positive, I want you to remember that it's because shame is the glue that holds self-sabotage in place. I really love that quote from a really cool therapist named Amanda White. If you make your intentions in the negative, you make your intentions about I shouldn't do this, I can't do this, I'm not going to do this. You are inviting more shame into your life. It's like saying I'm bad when I eat too many snacks late at night so I won't eat snacks late at night. If you make your intentions more in the positive, you invite more self-respect. It's like saying, I am good and I deserve to take care of my body in many different ways at the end of the day. So I will do a breathwork practice at night instead of I won't eat food. So that's the first thing, make your intentions in the positive rather than in the negative. 


The second thing is simplify, simplify, simplify, your intentions related to nutrition. Give yourself complete and total permission to take the all or nothing out of the things that you wanna do. So for example, if your goal is to just eat more vegetables, this isn't about ordering a freaking salad for work lunch every single day. It's about little things like putting spinach in your eggs in the morning, mixing peas or broccoli into your mac and cheese or like buying some micro greens that you can just like throw on really any meal. Or if your goal is to exercise more, it's not always about doing a full blown 60 to 75 minute workout class. It's about rolling out your yoga mat while your pasta water is boiling. That can be enough. It's about rolling out your yoga mat for five minutes first thing in the morning and just doing some stretches and 10 jumping jacks. That does make a difference in your life. And if you say to yourself, the only difference lies in these full 60 to 75 minute classes, you're really limiting your capacity to nourish yourself well this year. Just doing the simplest thing, the little things, it doesn't only count, it also really reinforces the habit formation in your brain and gets your brain thinking, oh, okay, I can actually do this thing instead of saying, this is an absolute drag and I need to put in a ton of effort to be able to do it. And doing just a little something is not only better than doing nothing, it's also better than doing everything. Also better than doing it all. We burn out really, really quickly when we try to do it all. When we try to, when we look at things in an all or nothing way, when we look at exercise in an all or nothing way, when we look at nutrition in an all or nothing way, we burn out so quickly.


I always say that doing nothing and doing everything are two sides of the same coin. And we hear the word, we hear the word enough a lot. We hear, you are enough, you have done enough, this is enough, but I really encourage you to take a second to notice how powerful that concept really is. Think about this when it comes to nutrition. When we try to do it all, when we try to do everything, when we try to change everything about the way that we're eating, we get more stressed. We legitimately get more stressed about food and we really set ourselves up for the binge restrict cycle, for the burnout cycle. When our life starts to revolve around our wellness practices, we lose other aspects of our life. So what would it look like to change enough things about your nutrition this year? Small things that make an impact rather than trying to change everything and then burning out or just making your life revolve around nutrition/wellness practices. You need to do enough, not all. You need to do something, not everything. One thing is not just better than nothing, it's actually better than everything. Really.


And as I segue into the last part of this podcast, I guess that I actually do wanna share a third thing about this. And that is create a word of the year that kind of encapsulates your intention or what you want to work towards for the year and try to let your nutrition and wellness decisions be informed by that word. So if your word of the year is energy, can you use that word as a gentle compass for your nutrition and wellness decisions? Which nutrition choice here is going to help me cultivate more energy. And that's not always going to be the thing that has, you know, salmon and brown rice and vegetables. It often is going to be something else. It often is going to be incorporating more variety. It's going to be making sure you have things that also nourish your soul and make you have positive emotions and social experiences. And so you can use your word of the year to kind of gently inform your nutrition decisions and make choices that are in alignment with your values. And when you feel like you're making choices that are in alignment with your values, which is your word of the year, you start to feel really empowered. And that is positively reinforced. I think there's a lot of people on the internet telling us what we should hold important about nutrition. You should prioritize this, you should prioritize this. You need to start eating things that are gonna dip up, blah, right? What's important to you? What do you hold most important? What's the one word that you wanna make the theme of your year, the theme of your 2024? And when you're making your nutrition decisions, can you come back to that word as a gentle compass, as a gentle guide. And your word of the year might not seem related to nutrition, but I promise it almost certainly is in some way.


So I'm gonna end today's episode by just going into that concept of the word of the year a little bit more and sharing what my word of the year is. Your word of the year is your theme for the year. It's your guidepost for the year while you're navigating different decisions and moving throughout your day. It's like a compass, rather than something that you need to achieve. So my word of the year one year was love. It wasn't like my goal was to achieve love and find a partner by the end of the year, but the goal was to cultivate a sense of love and let my decisions be driven by love rather than let my decisions be driven by fear or anxiety. My word of the year last year was ease and I didn't achieve ease by the end of the year. I didn't feel like I had cultivated a complete sense of ease by the end of the year, but I let my decisions be driven by what's going to help me feel a sense of ease and a sense of relief in my body. How can I make this a little bit easier? How can I stop making everything so hard? And I shared more about you know, exactly what I learned with that in my last episode of the year last year. And I think another thing to remember about this word of the year, as you're kind of chewing on it and thinking about what your word of the year might be is that there's also a little bit of a spiritual element to it, I think. When you set this powerful intention, this powerful theme at the beginning of your year, I think you're kind of setting a little bit of a spiritual intention and you might end up learning about that word or about that theme in unexpected ways and in unexpected events through your life. And you might notice things that you wouldn't otherwise notice while you're kind of keeping that theme on your heart throughout the year. For example, my year of love actually ended up having the most significant breakup of my entire life in it. And through that, I ended up really learning how to choose true love and what real love actually meant. And my year of open actually came with a pretty significant head injury that I've talked about on this podcast before. And that ended up really opening me up to life in a way that I could have never expected. It was a near-death experience that opened me up to living every single day as fully and authentically as I possibly could. Would have never expected that to happen in my year of open. And my year of space, my year when I just really wanted to have more spaciousness in my life, was 2020 when the global pandemic happened. I never expected having so much space in my life. I lost all my jobs that year. I had to quarantine that year. I spent more time alone than I ever had before that year. And yeah, my year of ease is as I talked about in my last episode of 2023, ended up being all about me realizing the ways that I make my life not so easy. So, you know, I invite you to use your word of the year, your theme of the year as your compass while you're making certain decisions about nutrition and health and more, about food and movement and more, and I also invite you to let it be a little bit of a spiritual intention, surrender, let go, and notice the unexpected ways in which you may be shown to different lessons that have to do with your theme that you could have never expected. 


And the last thing is to remember that you have all year to use your theme as a compass. So it's okay if you feel like, you know, you set your intention today and then next week you've completely forgotten about it. And then you're like, oh my gosh, I forgot my word of the year is kindness. I haven't been that kind to myself or I was that kind to someone today. It's okay. It's a process. We have to let ourselves fall from center. Notice we're off center and come back to center. We have all year to use this theme and you might just be using the first couple months of the year to get charged up, to get grounded, to get centered and to figure out what the word actually means to you. You might know that you want this to be your year of kindness or your year of energy or your year of creativity, but you might not know what that means yet. And maybe for the first quarter of the year, you're just trying to define it. That's okay. That's what I love about making a theme for 12 months. It's a long time. A lot can happen and a lot might change throughout the course of the year. So please be patient with yourself, which is my segue into my word of the year, which is patience. 


I have a lot of memories of my dad and my grandma telling me to be patient when I was younger. I think some other people might have this association with the word patience too, like their parents telling them that like patience is a virtue, you have to be virtuous by being patient, right? I don't mean patience as a virtue. I mean patience in the most serene and kind sense. I mean patience in the most... in the sense that I prioritize kindness and alignment and self-care over any perceived construct of time. And I mean patience in the sense that I remember the beauty that comes out of being patient with everything in life, including some of the most annoying obstacles that pop up. 


I mentioned earlier that one year, my word of the year was open really bad head injury that year. It was a near-death experience when it happened. It really opened me up to squeezing the juice out of every day and making the most out of every day. That was the year that I went nomadic and I ended my relationship and left New York City. Everything was just like, boom, boom, boom, I'm going to live fully. I'm really proud of that. I'm really proud of that pivot and I'm really proud of my ability to squeeze the juice out of every single day. And the way I've squeezed the juice out of life and have just leapt into a sense of adventure has served me so much. And I know that it just served other people a lot too. I've been able to serve people in a way that I never have before because of everything I've learned and everything I've dove into and everything I've absorbed over the last couple of years. But I think I'm ready to stop squeezing the juice out of life so much and let myself kind of soak in the juice of life. Sorry to say the word juice, it's kind of weird, but like bathe in the juice of life a little bit more. 


You know, I have a tendency sometimes to live like everything is slipping away. And on one hand, that's so beautiful. So many things can be true at the same time. We've got to live every day like it's our last. And also I want to live less like everything is slipping away. And so I do want to remember that everything is slipping away and everything is temporary. And I also want to remember that everything is here now. And if it's not here now, it's coming. And I can trust that it's coming. You know, I don't lack an ounce of enthusiasm for life at all. Anyone who knows me has talked to me for more than five seconds knows that. But I just don't want to clench onto it so hard. I don't want to clench onto life so hard. I want to remember that I have time. I know that my time is finite. So I don't want to sleep on it or linger or hesitate on things too much. But I also don't want to live like the last grain of sand is about to drop all of the time. You know, I guess even if the last grain of sand is about to drop, I don't want to spend my time watching that last grain of sand dropping. I want to embrace it and appreciate it and share it and love it and be patient. I really do think the key to ease, which was my word of the year last year, is patience and trust. 


So my mission statement or affirmation for this year, and I encourage you to do this when you choose your word of the year too, kind of write a mission statement around that word. That can change and evolve, right, as the year goes on, but, you know, try to create one that is just for now. My mission statement is, I am patient because I know it is safe for me to trust that I have enough time to take care of myself slowly and fully, and enough time to slow down, to be kind to every person I “encounter”, to listen to them kindly with my eyes and with my whole body and my whole being. And I have time for my romantic soulmate to meet me on the path I am already “walking.” In parentheses, I don't have to force it. You know, I guess I basically, that's my mission statement. 


So many of the things that have gone haywire in my life have been because of impatience. You know, I've settled for the wrong romantic partners because I was afraid that I was never going to find another one and I leapt into certain business ventures too quickly that ended up being really stressful and burnt me out because I felt like I had to do it right now. I couldn't sit on it any longer. And you know my body burnt out. My body got tired when I felt like I didn't have enough patience to slow down to take care of myself all of the way. So I realized that a lot of the things that have gone wrong in my life, a lot of the shit that has hit the fan has been due to impatience. And so this is my year of patience. Patience in the sense that I trust divine timing when it comes to finding a romantic partner. Patience in the sense that I trust that I have time to be kind to every person I encounter whether it is a stranger in the grocery store or the relative I'm having dinner with or whatever it is, I can be patient and slow down and be present with them fully. There's nowhere else I have to be. And patience in the sense that I slow down to take care of myself fully and I think that this is gonna be a really good year for that because this nomad is finally getting on an apartment lease I am finally gonna have a home where I settle down and live and don't travel around all the time and constantly staying in different places. I'm really excited to ground down in Lisbon this year. 


So alright, hopefully I did a little bit of a better job at keeping this episode a little bit shorter. I'd love to hear your thoughts and feedback and questions that popped up for you today. Thank you so much for tuning into today's episode. If you enjoyed it, please leave a five star rating or review on Apple or Spotify. That really helps me out with getting the pod to more people. And let me know your thoughts. DM me, reach out to me. I'm incredibly accessible and I would love to hear from you. All right, take a nice deep breath, exhale, let it go. Have a beautiful rest of your day. I'll be back here next week.



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